English Idioms with word old

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Idiom Meaning Sentence
a chip off/of the old block a son or daughter who is very much like his or her father in character or temperament "He is just as stubborn as his father." "Oh, yes, he’s certainly a chip off the old block."
an old flame someone of the opposite sex to whom one was strongly attracted at some time in the past Chris ran into Amanda in a restaurant yesterday. She’s an old flame of his from their student days at Oxford.
an old fogey an elderly, narrow-minded person who is out of touch with modern thinking You can call me an old fogey if you want, but I think that many young people are misguided.
an old hand at something someone with a lot of experience and practice at (doing something) "I need someone to help me fix these shelves." "Well, ask Tom. He’s an old hand at that sort of thing."
old hat out of date, no longer original, topical or fashionable "What did you think of the lecture?" "Well, quite honestly, most of it was old hat!"
the old man a term used for a father or a man in authority over a group of employees etc.; e.g. a firm’s director, a headmaster Oh, by the way, I just saw the old man. He wants to see you in his office immediately.
the old school traditional thinking/standards/code of behaviour as in former times, as opposed to modern thinking Our history professor is one of the old school. He expects us to be the same as students in his days.
any old how in a careless, bad manner Tom doesn’t care what his homework looks like. He does it any old how.
for old times' sake for sentimental reasons related to pleasant memories from the past I spent my childhood in Warsaw. I'd like to go back there one day - for old times' sake.
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